Project Team Members

Ivar McGrath

Principal Investigator

Ivar McGrath is Associate Professor in the School of History, UCD. The original idea for mapping the barracks emerged out a chapter on the subject in his 2012 book, Ireland and Empire, 1692-1770 (London: Pickering and Chatto, 2012). There may also have been a residual hangover from a previous career prior to becoming a historian, given that he spent three years serving as a private soldier in the Irish army in 1983-6, including six months with UNIFIL in 1984-5. For more information on other publications and historical activities, click here or contact at ivar.mcgrath@ucd.ie.

Patrick Walsh

Principal Investigator

Dr Patrick Walsh is a lecturer in history at TCD, and is a Co-Investigator on the Irish Residential Barracks Project. He is especially interested in the social and economic impact of the countrywide network of barracks, seeing them as part of the wider expansion of the agents of the state in eighteenth-century Ireland. Patrick is currently writing a book provisionally entitled State and Society in Ireland, 1685-1783. 

Suzanne Forbes

Principal Investigator

Dr Suzanne Forbes is a lecturer in history at the Open University, and is a Co-Investigator on the Irish Residential Barracks Project. Suzanne is also the mind behind the Barracks website and was responsible for designing the website and the barracks map.

Michael Kennedy

Research Team Member

Dr Michael Kennedy was responsible for photography during the research team’s visit to Country Armagh in August 2014. He is the Executive Editor of the Royal Irish Academy’s Documents on Irish Foreign Policy series, has written widely on British-Irish relations, cross-border relations in Ireland, and Ireland’s foreign and defence policies. 

Tim Watt

Research Team Member

I completed a PhD at Queen’s University Belfast, in March 2014, entitled ‘Order and Disorder in Ireland, 1692-1735’. The thesis explored large-scale popular violence and the effects on people in Ireland of war in Europe, and Great Britain’s transformation into a ‘fiscal-military state’. I published an article in Irish Historical Studies (May 2014), examining the relationship between the corruption of the law and gang violence in Dublin in the 1720s, and I am currently investigating popular resistance to taxation in early eighteenth-century Ireland. My research interests include popular politics, the forces of law and order, and function of the ‘moral economy’ in Irish society. 

Eoin Kinsella

Research Team Member

Emma Lyons

Research Team Member